If you graduated between 1960-1969, please share your memories here!
JOE PASKEWICZ 1968
9/22/2010

HEY...ANYONE OUT THERE FROM 1968. THINK
MRS MULLIGAN IS STILL AROUND? REMEMBER WENDYS DELI OR PATS PIZZA FOR LUNCH?
ANYONE STILL LIVING IN MASPETH?

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I'm more than sure the Wendys is gone. The diner that was on the corner of 61st and Flushing Ave became a Wetson hambugers and is now a Dunkin Donuts. Not too sure if Pats is still there either. The last time I saw Mrs. Mulligan was in the fall of 1970. She was still teaching the second grade. She must be long retired by now.

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Jack Susenburger
9/23/2010

Living in Herkimer NY with wife Joan - former Joan Pytelewski ( class of 67)

We have 1 daughter - Jessica

I'm teaching classes at a local Community College and loving it - it gives me time to play golf during the nice weather.

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Joe Morena Class of 1966
9/25/2010

It seems funny that sometimes you can’t remember what you had for dinner 2 nights ago but you can remember all you teachers (nuns ) names from elementary school. That seems to be the case with me. Not only can I remember their names but I can remember incidents that happened in each class. Sad isn’t it???.. When I saw this web site, I knew I had to write something because those 8 years in St Stan’s were the foundation of the rest of my life. I know that to some that may sound a bit crazy but think about it, a lot of our interactions with the other kids in our class made us the people we are today. We had our first crush (Pat Kearney) our first kiss (Madeline Debolt) the first time I played drums in public (Christmas Play where Sister Margaret Concepter had me play “Little drummer Boy in front of the stage while the girls choir sang.). All these happenings had a very big influence on me.
Lets start with the Principals Sister Stella Francis then Sister Raphael Maria. They were ok.
So lets start in the First Grade -1958 with Sister Mary Leonard. We were in the class to the left of the center door on the first floor. She was a very nice nun. Petite and very soft spoken, considering she was dealing with 60 6 year olds. YES 60 kids in the class. Nowadays teachers get crazy because they can’t handle 25 in a class. We had 30 of each. Wonder how that would go over today. But she was able to handle all that we gave her as “First Graders”-crying for our”mommies” and wanting to eat lunch. I was one of the few who actually went home for lunch. Since I had cousins in 5 other grades, we got picked up for lunch.
Second grade- 1959-Sister Mary Margaret-corner room facing the back on the first floor, again quiet but stern. Still had 60 in the class. This is the year we received First Communion. While studying for it we had to learn all the Commandments and learn about “Mortal ,Venial and Actual sins. At that time there was a priest-Father Howley who was a real S.O.B. When we had our first confession he didn’t like how I was acting on line so he pulled me off the line by my ear and told my mom that I wasn’t going to receive Communion. Well when I got home I really go it-if you know what I mean.
Third grade 1960 -Sister John Murial-corner room facing the street on the first floor Short a bit on the “plump”side. Still 60 in the class.
Fourth grade-1961-corner room on the other end of the first floor facing the street. The FIRST WOMAN LAY teacher in the school. Miss Jane Gouck. All the boys had their first teacher crush. I was also a crossing guard on Grand and 61st Street, across from Carvel. We all waited for her to come back from lunch-she ate in the diner on Flushing Avenue. I was so bad as a guard I had to give BACK my badge on white strap-felt like that program “Branded” with Chuck Conners when the stripped him of his Army stripes. But as I said all the boys had a crush on her and it was devastating when she said she was getting married. We felt like we were in a Little Rascals when Miss Crabtree got married. That was also the year of the Cuban Missile crisis. A lot of good was accomplished by getting under our wooden desks-like they were going to stop atomic radiation.
Fifth grade-1962-FINALLY UPSTAIRS -Sister Mary Lambert-corner room facing the schoolyard. Here is where the hormones starting kicking in. First crush -Pat Kearney. She had long brown hair, very quiet and she wrote left handed(how do I remember that??). I could not take my eyes off of her. There were other girls that I noticed-Pat Patucha, Joan Pastorini, Patti Byrnes, Linda Guadagno, but Pat Kearney was the first girl I really noticed. This year is when me Mike Massone, Anthony Palumbo, Steve Colosi, Chet Wernicki, Eugene Kapela really started to get to be best friends.
Sixth Grade-1963-upstairs facing the street. Sister Maria Auxilia-“Stone Face”-she was up to that time the worst nun I had. NO personality-Wait nuns don’t have personalities!!! She was a stone faced nun. Didn’t take any you know what from us. Also this was the year we got some kids that were “left back” I don’t want to say their names but they know who they are. One actually opened up T J’S pub on Fresh Pond Road years later. Now this was the year we started to notice the girls in the “other sixth grade” Jackie Snedecky, Camielle Deagrosa, Madeline Debolt Janet MaGill. The one big event of this year was that President Kennedy got shot while we were in class and they brought TV’s in the room. We were all crying. This was also the year I started to learn how to play the drums and when Sister Margaret Concepter would come in with that chalk thing that held 6 pieces of chalk to draw the musical notes on the board. The drum thing would come back in the 8th grade.
Seventh Grade 1964-Sister Maria Pacific

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Seventh Grade 1964-Sister Maria Pacifica-“prune face”. Now we really started to notice the other 7th grade girls. We would hang out with them in the schoolyard and in the lunch room. Still there were 60 in our class and 60 in the other class. Also there were some girls in the grade below us that started to catch our eyes.
Now FINALLY the EIGHT GRADE-1965 Sister Joseph Liguori. Toughest nun of them all. But since we were the BIG Guys in the school we “thought “ we could get away with anything. WRONG!!! She was like Gestapo. We had the cloak room in the back of the room, she once slapped a boy down the first aisle through the cloak room and up the last aisle. We were shaking in our seats. In December of 1965, it was Fathers Heaneys 50th Jubilee and the whole school put on a Christmas play. The 2 eight grade classes did songs from the Sound of Music. We sang “You are 16 going on 17”, “Edelweiss”. Then came MY big moment. Remember I told you about the drums-well I had to sit in front of the stage facing the ALL girls’ choir and play “The Little Drummer Boy” As I said this was the first time I ever played in public. Little did I realize that ONE year later I would be the drummer in the BEST BAND in Maspeth –“FAZE 5” and come back to play in 2 Battle of the Bands-which we won both. Getting back to the class, the last week of school all the guys decided that we would rip off the school emblem off of everybody’s shirt. Well Sister Liguori didn’t take to kindly with that and she threatened us with not graduating. We had to apologize and she let it go.
On a side note – the names of the priests we had in school were Heaney Howley Daly Dooley-say that fast!!
Well this is it-finally Graduation June 19,1966, I still have the the autograph book with all those great lines-“2 young 2 b 4 gotten”. I hope you enjoyed this trip down memory lane.



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Joe Morena
9/25/2010

I live in Lincroft NJ wife Diane daughters Stacy 29 Jodi 25 email joseph_morena@yahoo.com

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JOE PASKEWICZ
9/30/2010

YEP I REMEMBER PRUNEFACE. I ALSO REMEMBER WHEN THEY USED TO SHOW US OLD ABBOT AND COSTELLO MOVIES IN THE AUDITORIUM AND THE FILM WOULD ALWAYS
BREAK 3 OR 4 TIMES!. REMEMBER THE "CLICKERS" THE NUNS USED TO MOVE US AROUND LIKE CATTLE. GOOD THING THEY COULD NOT AFFORD REAL CATTLE PRODS!

LINE UP IN SIZE ORDER!!!!

EVERYONE LIKED FATHER DOOLEY BUT FATHER
HOWLEY SCARED THE CRAP OUT OF EVERYONE.

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Joe Morena
10/1/2010

Some more memories--I do remember the Friday afternoon movies, what about when the nuns have us go outside and "clap the erasers" and then come in and wash down the blackboards. Also when we fire drills we had walk quietly with our "finger on our lip". Also the carnivals in the school yard.Also in the 8th grade we had to go to 8 o'clock Mass. As a alter boy we went to Rye Beach and also when we had to sell subscriptions for books to get a new bicycle. MORE TO COME!!!!

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Marie karsch(nerlich)
7/24/2012

Talk about memory lane! Joe I honestly do not remember you but I sure remembered all the classmates you listed! I could add a few as well that you left out.I do remember Sister Ligouri she slapped Jimmy Koslowsi 25 times and left her. Handprint on his face ,the entire class was silent I got in trouble when she said Nerlich do you have something to say and I told her that I felt sorry for him,she told me to go keep him company in the hall...I will NEVER forget that incident!

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JOE
8/1/2012

JIMMY LIVED UP THE BLOCK FROM ME. HE WAS A YEAR OLDER. HE WAS A CRAZY KID. WE PLAYED BALL ALOT TOGETHER.

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I just had to comment on Sr. Ligouri... yes indeed she was one tough cookie. I had her back in 1966-67. This was her last year as she then was transferred to St. Thomas in B'kyln, and then to Our Lady of My. Carmel in Astoria. She retired shortly after and, she of course in now long deceased. To be fair, I really felt she was tough with those who needed to be disciplined. She was very good to me and she even attended my high school graduation. I eventually lost touch with her after her retirement and then I found about several years later that she died. The only sister that taught me, and is still living, is Sr. Francis Claire. I had her in the first grade back in 1959. The second grade was Mrs. Mildred Mulligan; the third grade was Sr. John Muriel; the fourth grade was Miss Jane Gouck; the fifth grade was Sr. Mary Lambert; the sixth grade was Sr. Mary Leticia; the seventh grade was Sr. Mary Felicita; the eight grade was Sr. Joseph Ligouri. Of course I do recall some of the other sisters, ie: Sr. Mary Leonard, Sr Mary Margaret, Sr. St. Bruno, Sr. Ann Immaculate, Sr. Margaret Aloysius, Sr. Donald Maria, Sr. Anna Cleanus, who ran the monthly movies, Sr. Marie Auxillia, Sr. St. Gemma, Sr. Marion Consillio, Sr. Margaret Concepta (music director), Sr. Rose Raphael, Sr. Jean Amata, Miss Mitchel, Sr. Maire Pacifica, Sr. John Regis and Sr. Joan Thomas. I'm not too certain of the spellings and I'm sure there are others, but I recall these quite vividly. I don't reside in Maspeth any longer, so I don't get the chance to see St. Stans. I did attend the re-dedication mass but haven't been back since. Plenty of memories, both good and not so good, of by-gone era, but I was very fortunate to be a part of it. I will do more postings, but I think I've said enough for now.

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Marie Karsch (nerlich)
8/4/2012

Sr.Liquori was always to me as well,unfortunately that slapping session of that young boy is engraved in my memory bank forever.I did take piano lessons for many years with Sister Margaret Concepta and will remember Sr.Lambert she was soooo positive and very pretty! Memory lane! Maspeth is just a special place miss the Polish stores!

Whoops...I meant to write, Our Lady of Mt. Carmel. Sorry.

james galati
11/3/2012

I graduated in 1964, I attached my grad. pic.Still have my autograph book & a couple of report cards. Had Sr. Ligouri in 8th grade. She was tough on me, the class clown. Was in her class the day JFK was shot.. Principal, Sr. Stella Francis rushed in to turn on the TV. Left Maspeth in 65' for So. Calif.....now living in Las Vegas.

I have another comment on the sisters. As I mentioned most if not all of the older sisters were transferred by the late 60's or very early 70's, however as part of the 100th anniversary of St. Stan's which was in the fall 1972 part of the celebration was a reunion of all the old faculty. I was in attendance and the minute the sisters appeared, I couldn't believe what I saw. As memory serves, there was sisters Mary Felicita, Marie Auxillia, John Muriel and Joseph Ligouri all in modified habits. Needless to say, I didn't recognize them but they all wore name tags, which helped. When the anniversary journal came out, I looked at the group shot and gradually I began to recognize them. There several others as well, but I couldn't recall them. What a shock! But, these were the conditions that prevailed. Truly amazing to think that some things you though would never change actually did!

Once again, I'm really not sure what became of most the sisters. From what I heard over the years, Sr. Joan Thomas left the order as did Sr. Ann Immaculate. Sr. Mary Lambert had the 5th grade for several years and when Sr. Auxillia left, she took the 6th grade for 2 years. I believe she eventually left the order as well. Sr. Leticia originally had the 5th grade and then took over the 6th. She was reassigned and eventually retired. She may now be deceased. Sr. Francis Claire was replaced by Sr. Helen Dolores and she was replaced by Sr. John Regis who had the 1st grade for 2 years. I guess, as with everyone, the elderly sisters died and some of the younger ones stayed in the order and went to other assignments but who can say for sure. We can speculate all we want but we never really know for sure. I don't mean to sound so dramatic, but this was very much a part of a different age and some of us, although we may try to hold on, alas, have to let go. As I mentioned earlier, life goes on with us or without us!

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Marie Karsch
8/4/2012

Yes,Sister Liquori was tough she was always nice to me as well.Unfortunately that one incident is engraved in my memory bank.I could not imagine an instructor slapping a child and yes we were all counting her "slaps" that day. I remember the music teacher I had to take piano lessons from her! Memory lane can be fun.Maspeth is still a unique little place I miss the wonderful Delia's!

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Yes, I too recall all the hymn practices on Wednesdays at 2:30; the 9 a m mass on Sundays. The First Friday mass at 8 a m; the stations of the cross at 2:30 on the Fridays of Lent. Sr. Concepta knew her stuff, but she was very hesitant on the organ. In my later years, I played the organ in St. Stans and now at Our Lady Queen of Martyrs, in Forest Hills and while I do recall the many music lessons, my style of playing is much louder and much more forceful than dear Sr. Concepta. All in all, I do wish, if it were possible, to go back for just one more time to see all the things that I took for granted.

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I also meant to comment that I believe I read somewhere that Sr. Concepta changed orders. She is now a member of the Srs of the Infant Jesus, (CIJ); instead of the Srs. of St. Joseph, (CSJ). Of course whether this is true or not I really can't say for sure.

Well . . . as tough as Sr. Ligouri was there was another one that was more so. This dates back to 1960, +/-, Sr. Margaret Aloysius. She had the 3rd grade. Well, as best as I can recall, this was in the auditorium, and the children were finishing lunch. Some poor unfortunate child must have done something wrong, and Sr. Aloysius grabbed him by his ear, 3 seats in, and pulled him over the other children. Once she got him in front of her, and she wasn't much taller than he was, she grabbed his hair and starting smacking him across the face so many times I lost count! I don't know what this poor kid did, but I'll bet he NEVER did it again! A bit much for the 3rd grade, but these were the conditions that prevailed in those days. She was replaced by Sr. Donald Maria, who remained for at least 2 years. There was another, Sr. Catherine Marita, who succeeded Sr. Anna Clennus in the fourth grade. There were stories about her too. I recall another episode with Sr. Ligouri, but I'll leave that for another time.

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Here's another episode with Sr. Joseph Ligouri. It was 1963,+/- and I was in the 5th grade. We had Sr. Mary Lambert. Well . . . St. Stan's was starting a bowling league and Sr. Lambert took all those concerned into the auditorium. There was a handful of those not interested and who remained in class, of which, I was one. She had left the T V on for us to watch. Of course, no one really cared about the show in question and naturally everyone was making quite a racket. All of a sudden, the door flew open, hitting the T V, knocking the set senseless and in stormed Sr. Ligouri. At the top of her lungs she screamed, "WHAT'S GOING ON IN HERE??!!!" Needless to say, there was dead silence! She then proceeded to march us into her classroom. So I brought a nature book to read, and she stopped me at the door say, " YOUR NOT BRINGING ANY STORY BOOKS IN HERE! GO BACK AND GET A BOOK TO STUDY FROM!!!" On my return to I was greeted by an irate Sr. Lambert waving her finger and sternly saying, "OKAY, YOU JUST WAIT UNTIL THIS AFTERNOON!!!" It was indeed quite an interesting morning and even though I am now 60 years old, I'll always remember it.

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Marie Karsch
8/4/2012

Wow,I remember Sr. Aloysius.I don't recall the other nuns you mentioned. Sr. Concepta was feisty as well. I recall her tripping down the aisle on one of the wed.afternoon sessions unfortunately for moi she caught me giggling and pulled me up to stand by the stage for the rest of the afternoon.I was sooo embarrassed.At least she did not slap me,but I did get paddled in the first grade with a ping pong paddle for talking too much.I do not recall the nun's name and she also called me a German brat....I was six years old.My momma set her straight! So comical what you remember after such a long time.

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Dr. Robert A. Cospito
8/5/2012

Yes indeed, Sr. Concepta as well as most of the others seemed to mellow after so many years. I believe that after 1968-69 is when most if not all the sisters were transferred. Ah well, as the poet once said, "You can't go home again."

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Marie Karsch
8/4/2012

Haha the bowling league! I joined that league!

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The bowling league, at the time, was in early infancy, and I'm not sure if it exists today. I never went out for anything, as I usually had my nose in the books. I do recall another incident with Sr. Aloysius, this was back in 1960, (+/-), in the church on Sunday at the 9 a m mass. I was in the second grade and the sisters used to make sure you knelt straight and didn't have your rear end on the edge of the pew. So . . . lucky me was in a row with a broken kneeler, and I really couldn't kneel at all. Well . . . along comes Sr. Aloysius and naturally she sees me and just stares, with a glare that went directly through you. I tried to motion to her that the kneeler was broken, but she didn't, couldn't or wouldn't see it. I thought to myself, I'd better duck because here it comes, and she had dead aim too. But then as got closer, she realized what the problem was and backed off. That was the closest I ever came to getting it. I must admit that throughout my 8 years I never got a smack of any sort. Of course that didn't exempt me from getting yelled at. Yet, as I mentioned already, by 1966-67, the sisters seemed to mellow a bit and by the early 70's most, if not all, had been transferred. I did neglect to mention Sr. Miriam Elizabeth, who replaced Sr. John Muriel. She and Sr. Marie Pacifica remained at St. Stan's for a several years after all the changes took place. Sr. Pacifica modified her habit, but Sr Miriam stayed in the traditional habit until her death, some years later. Ironically, yes, I do miss them all, and I wish I could see them all again.The thing that stands out the most after all these years is this, although most of the sisters were elderly, they always had a dedication to their profession. They were there everyday no matter what conditions prevailed. To this day, I don't think I could have done half of the tasks assigned to me in my lifetime if I didn't recall how dedicated these women were. I mean this with all my heart and as tough as some of them were, I still continue to applaud all their monumental efforts.

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Okay, one more episode, this time it was Sr. Lambert. It was the fifth grade in the year 1963 (+/-). I really don't recall what the actual cause was, but Sr. Lambert got annoyed at someone regarding an arithmetic problem. Of course now its math, but in those days it was arithmetic. Anyway, she became progressively annoyed and before long, she assigned the entire class to write out the numbers 1 to 1 million five times. Well, the next morning, naturally no one was able to finish in one night, she stood by the classroom door and asked one by one how much we did, and the next thing you knew the entire class, some 50 students, were sitting on the floor in that cold, drafty hall endeavoring to finish. Once again, amusing now, but NOT at the time! It really is amazing some of the things in life we never forget. In fact, myself anyway, the older I get-the MORE things I seem to recall!

Marie Karsch
8/6/2012

I must have been absent the time Sister Lambert became so angry about a math problem! Yes,some funny memories but I am glad I attended the neighborhood school. It was nice to be able to walk three blocks to school and go home for lunch.It was also a great Educational foundation for myself. I attended St.Angela Hall after St.Stan.s.I really wanted to go to Martin Luther High I know I tried but I can't remember why I did go there!

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I really can't recall any other episode with Sr. Lambert as she was very even tempered, compared to some of the others. I do recall an episode with Sr. Felicita, the year was 1965 -/+ and we were learning geometry. Well . . . math was never my strongest subject, in fact to this very day and with 3 doctorate degrees, I still can't add one and one. Anyway, she had a triangle on the board and she called on me to analyze it or some such. After 20 agonizing minutes of standing there like a jerk, sister starts screaming because I couldn't do what ever it was I was supposed to do. So, instead of getting smacked, she tells me to go back to the sixth grade. I think I would have rather gotten smacked than go back to Sister Leticia, so I spent the longest morning ever, back in the sixth grade. The only thing that saved me was that afternoon we had hymn practice. All in all - quite a day. Now its to laugh, but back then it was anything but funny.

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Ahhh, yes I do recall one more episode. The year was 1962,(+ / -), and I was in the fourth grade. The teacher was Miss Gouck. Well on each and every Friday, she would give tests and quizzes on what we learned during that week. As I mentioned earlier, math was NEVER my greatest subject, and quite simply I didn't know how many nines went into twenty-seven. So after a very loud, verbal chastisement, Miss Gouck flung my note book across the room and told me to go in the hall until I learned my lesson. Once again, it was a long morning! Amazing how you never forget these things no matter how old you get. Of course its funny now, but it sure wasn't funny then!

Ironically, there was another episode with Sr. Lambert. This concerned a play, I believe for St. Patrick's day. Well . . . Sr. Lambert marched us all to the auditorium for auditions for this extravaganza and of course, my hand never went up for any parts. So she assigns to take care of the lighting. Well . . . the entire play was done with the same color lights. So all in all, I had it fairly easy. The only odd thing was the that at one point the script called for the singing of Dominique, in french, a song performed by the singing nun. A hit of the time. To this day I don't know what this had to do with St. Patrick, but Sr. Auxillia was called on by Sr. Lambert to come in and coach the cast on the singing of this particular song, and in french too. Needless to say, the result, after a week of grueling unsuccessful coaching, was playing a recording of the song with the cast standing looking foolish. Ah yes, NOW, it is to laugh!

Ironically, there was another episode with Sr. Lambert. This concerned a play, I believe for St. Patrick's day. Well . . . Sr. Lambert marched us all to the auditorium for auditions for this extravaganza and of course, my hand never went up for any parts. So she assigns to take care of the lighting. Well . . . the entire play was done with the same color lights. So all in all, I had it fairly easy. The only odd thing was the that at one point the script called for the singing of Dominique, in french, a song performed by the singing nun. A hit of the time. To this day I don't know what this had to do with St. Patrick, but Sr. Auxillia was called on by Sr. Lambert to come in and coach the cast on the singing of this particular song, and in french too. Needless to say, the result, after a week of grueling unsuccessful coaching, was playing a recording of the song with the cast standing looking foolish. Ah yes, NOW, it is to laugh! But not back then.

Ironically, there was another episode with Sr. Lambert. This concerned a play, I believe for St. Patrick's day. Well . . . Sr. Lambert marched us all to the auditorium for auditions for this extravaganza and of course, my hand never went up for any parts. So she assigns to take care of the lighting. Well . . . the entire play was done with the same color lights. So all in all, I had it fairly easy. The only odd thing was the that at one point the script called for the singing of Dominique, in french, a song performed by the singing nun. A hit of the time. To this day I don't know what this had to do with St. Patrick, but Sr. Auxillia was called on by Sr. Lambert to come in and coach the cast on the singing of this particular song, and in french too. Needless to say, the result, after a week of grueling unsuccessful coaching, was playing a recording of the song with the cast standing looking foolish. Ah yes, NOW, it is to laugh! But not back then, as you wouldn't dare laugh!

Ironically, there was another episode with Sr. Lambert. This concerned a play, I believe for St. Patrick's day. Well . . . Sr. Lambert marched us all to the auditorium for auditions for this extravaganza and of course, my hand never went up for any parts. So she assigns to take care of the lighting. Well . . . the entire play was done with the same color lights. So all in all, I had it fairly easy. The only odd thing was the that at one point the script called for the singing of Dominique, in french, a song performed by the singing nun. A hit of the time. To this day I don't know what this had to do with St. Patrick, but Sr. Auxillia was called on by Sr. Lambert to come in and coach the cast on the singing of this particular song, and in french too. Needless to say, the result, after a week of grueling unsuccessful coaching, was playing a recording of the song with the cast standing looking foolish. Ah yes, NOW, it is to laugh! But not back then, as you wouldn't dare laugh!

Ironically, there was another episode with Sr. Lambert. This concerned a play, I believe for St. Patrick's day. Well . . . Sr. Lambert marched us all to the auditorium for auditions for this extravaganza and of course, my hand never went up for any parts. So she assigns to take care of the lighting. Well . . . the entire play was done with the same color lights. So all in all, I had it fairly easy. The only odd thing was the that at one point the script called for the singing of Dominique, in french, a song performed by the singing nun. A hit of the time. To this day I don't know what this had to do with St. Patrick, but Sr. Auxillia was called on by Sr. Lambert to come in and coach the cast on the singing of this particular song, and in french too. Needless to say, the result, after a week of grueling unsuccessful coaching, was playing a recording of the song with the cast standing looking foolish. Ah yes, NOW, it is to laugh! But not back then, as you wouldn't dare laugh!

Marie Karsch
8/6/2012

Typing on an iPad creates too many errors....I meant to type that I did not go there...

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Okay, one more incident with Sr. Joseph Liguori. Since the 8th grade was exempt from hymn practice on Wednesday afternoons, some of the sisters used to teach religious ed to public school students. Well . . . one particular afternoon, one kid thought it would okay to run through the hall screaming and carrying on, that is until he got caught by, guess who? Well, she got him against the blackboard and just stared at him. Turned out he had gum in his mouth, so Sr. Liguori told him to spit it out, and he yelled back, "NO"! She stood there for the longest minute I can recall and she then went to her desk and took out that 18 inch metal ruler and slammed it on the desk, but she didn't let him have it across the face or hands! I thought to myself, this kid didn't know how lucky he really was. She eventually let him go and, I really don't remember much else. Ahh yes, again proof positive, that was truly a different age!

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Well . . . one more final comment. I believe the year was 1959/60, I was in the 1st grade. We had Sr. Francis Claire. It was mid-afternoon and someone had whistled and it was quite loud. Good as she was, this time sister got annoyed. She sternly asked, " Who just whistled?" There was dead silence! She asked again and again, still dead silence! Okay, you will all remain after until I find who it was. No one moved, I think they all stopped breathing too. It was a little after 3, and still a dead lock. I couldn't take it so I raised my hand and said, "Sister I whistled." She took me in the back of the room, as she knew damn well it wasn't me and she said "I want you to look at me and tell me you did it." So I looked at her and said, yes it was me. Okay she said sternly said, you are all dismissed! To this day, I don't know why I was such a martyr, I guess I just didn't want to stay late. Sister Francis Claire is still alive today, and is in the mother house of the Sisters of St. Joseph. She takes care of all the elderly and sick sisters, that is the few that are left. I still can't believe that I recall this incident after all these years, but some things you just don't forget!

I vaguely recall another brief episode, this time with Sr. John Muriel in the third grade. The year was 1961, and Sr. John Muriel used to order candies, potato chips and pretzels for all the classes to buy for a brief recess period during the mid morning hours. Anyway, guess who she picked to bring a delivery to the 7th grade? I believe it was Sr. Marion Consillio at the time, and I had no idea where the class room was. As memory recalls I walked up to steps to the second floor and, in so doing, dropped the entire order on the floor. I scrambled to put everything back in their respective boxes but it looked like a real mess. I knocked on the door of the classroom and handed it to the first person I saw, and ran back to my classroom as fast as I could. For the rest of the day every time someone knocked on the door, I thought for sure I was going to get yelled at for making sure a mess but I didn't. Once again, now to laugh but not then.

Frances Kosinski
10/11/2013

I graduated in 1965. My brother Robert in 1963. My sister Helen would have in1968 and brother James only made it through either first or second grade. I went to Christ the King for not quite a year and my brother went to LaSalle Military Academy. We then moved to Hicksville Long Island. I had Sr. Joan Thomas then Sr Margaret Concepter in second grade because they were short a teacher. She was out of class a lot and the other teachers filled in while she was teaching their class music. I had Ms. Hertle in fourth grade. I remember going to Novena on wed nights with Marion and Marylyn Lecznar. Fr. Howley would be so angry because we were laughing when Marion started to sing. I was in the choir and still remember singing the Mass in Latin and chant. I lived on the top floor above the Russian club on 61st ST. Bernadette, Donna and Jackie Carini lived below us. There is a Polish deli on the corner now and the food is delish. I am doing my ancestry and got to visit in 2011. The church was closed so we did not get to go in. I spent my vacation in cemeteries, Calvary, Pinelawn, Holy Rood and Calverton. We lived near Carol and Denise Spadel. Across from Anita Bubla. Down the block from Marcia Lewandowski, Kenneth Kopeka Rose and Nancy Czech. We had to pass the big dogs every day going to school JO JO and RayJO. The soda shop was on the corner and then Pani Krupka's store next to the bar until she moved to 56th Drive. Do you remember when the manhole exploded on 61st St and set the pole on fire about 1959? How about the veteran's day parades down 61stST. I am sure they started on Grand. The pool at Maurice Park and in the winter Ice skating. I remember the field trip to the World's Fair. Also seeing the Pope on Queens BLVD. I graduated from Hicksville H.S a year after Billy Joel. Went on to Nassau CC and SUNY Old Westbury. I went in to the Army as a Officer then retired and got an Associates degree in IT and an MBA from University of Phoenix. I am currently working on Ft. Huachuca in AZ for the Network Enterprise Command as a Procurement Coordinator. I married and then divorced. More later.

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In reply to Frances Kosinski, I do recall some of the names she mentioned and just to add when the public school across from the church burned and was later rebuilt and is now Martin Luther high School. Also, I feel compelled to mention, Fr. Howley was a very poor example of a priest. He was moody, rude and very crude! I also think that when Fr. Andrew Heaney, the pastor at the time, died Fr. Howley left St. Stans and the priesthood too. No loss!!! I do recall a heated argument I had with him and I told to shove the place up his ass!!! Many changes took place in Maspeth over the years. St. Stans even has a mass in Spanish now. The church was completely over hauled and personally I think it looks horrible! The buildings original design was NOT meant to be configured the way it is now. My sister and I now reside in Forest Hills and I work part time at Our Lady Queen of Martyrs. I do fondly recall many of the sisters and its sad all of them are gone forever, but what can you do? Alas, nothing stays the same forever. - Dr. Robert A. Cospito

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Frances Kosinski
10/12/2013

Dr. Cospito, I remember PS 73 fire because I had the measles and watched the whole thing from my kitchen window. Do you remember when the confessional was set on fire? All the jokes about the sins being told in there setting it ablaze. I think it was Fr. Howley's confessional. I never again went to confession in that confessional. I cannot make out from the pics of the church where some stuff is located. Is the original altar behind the wooden cross and screen? Is the grotto still in the church? Did they keep a part of the original altar as the table? I recognize the picture of the Lamb from the original altar. I fondly recall Fr. Dooley. I googled him and found that he was sent to I think St. Adelbert's parish where they found him dead from a heart attack. I am going to make it back to NY sometime and visit the school. I remember also going to the funeral Mass for Sr Aloysious Marie's mother. I cannot remember the name but there was a girl in my second grade class who died from holes in her heart. She lived across the street from us. Then Chris Grabowski died in Maurice park. Do you remember the man with the vegetable cart? We just liked to pet his horse.

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Yes, I do recall the confessional fire. If memory serves correct, someone had dropped a lit match into the box of candles and the curtain of the confessional went up. I really can't say if was Fr. Howley's confessional or not. I do recall Fr. Dooley very well. He was a very close friend and was greatly missed when he went to Resurrection/Ascension in Rego Park. He did eventually become a Monsignor and died shortly after. The altar of the newly redesigned church is in the center. The grotto is still there but the design was changed; the St. Joseph altar now has both Mary and St. Joseph. Mary's altar now has the tabernacle and a repository which is part of the chapel where sister's used to pray. Since there is only one sister there now its my guess she doesn't utilize too much space. I can only reiterate it's a horrible looking design and one that does not befit the contours of the church building. I also recall a man named Abbey, who used to sing, or attempt to, on Christmas day for the 9 am children's mass. He had a bad leg and had trouble walking but used to make it up the steps without too much trouble. He eventually died and eventually so many other changes took place over the years. All in all Maspeth is still a nice area and I do, at time miss it, but life goes on with us or without us.

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In addition to inappropriate design of the church, the organ was also rebuilt. It had fallen into disuse and was unplayable. When the church was redone, work was also done to the organ. A new console was added and in so doing the expression was broken so the instrument has no volume control. I'm not sure if that was taken care of or not. After I left in 1971, Ed Heil stayed on and played for another 20 years or so. Don Compettello replaced him and also stayed on for about 25 years. Then Donny left to go to St. Margarete's in Middle Village. I'm really not sure who's is there now. St. Stan's is partially merged with Transfiguration church which is about 3 blocks away. Holy Cross church is also about 2 to 3 blocks, but they're still pretty much on there own. However their school closed and the children now are enrolled in St. Stans. All in all things have really changed. I often recall the "OLD" St. Stans and wish I could go back for one more look at all the things I took for granted but, as the poet said, "Alas, you can't go home again".

Well . . . if my memory serves correct, here is another amusing incident. The year was 1962. I was in the 4th grade, Miss Gouck was the teacher. Yes a break from the sisters! We had to take turns doing certain tasks ie: cleaning the blackboards, clapping the erasers and the one that caught me was bringing the hymnals over for us to use at the 9 a m mass on Sunday. Well, I used to go to either the 7 or the 8 on Sunday as Miss Gouck was never there to check who was present or absent. All the sisters were there but Miss Gouck wasn't.
So . . . one Sunday, as I was leaving the 8 a m mass, someone spotted me and I knew they saw too. Miss Gouck would ask on Mondays who was at mass and who wasn't, but since I did go to mass, but not the 9, I just sat there and didn't say a word, until that one fateful day when I was seen by a fellow classmate leaving the 8 a m mass. Needless to say, I was ratted out and verbally chastised by Miss Gouck. Well, when the tasks were handed out and alternated each month my name came up to do the hymnals, at which Miss Gouck loudly proclaimed, "Well there's no point in assigning you as you never there!" So, I just sat there not saying anything while the others just sneered. Ahh yes now it is to laugh, but NOT then! Ironically then St. Stan's had 9 weekend masses and 5 weekday masses; while now I believe its either 4 or 5 masses on the weekends and just 1 mass daily. Quite a difference to say the least!

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Okay, here's another episode, I'm not of the year, early to mid 60's, but a missionary priest had come to do a mission primarily directed at the school. Well . . . guitars were beginning to make their presence known in church liturgies, but not in St. Stan's, at least at that particular time. So the sisters had all the children go to the basement of the school for an 8 a m mass, with some kid, don't know who playing Sons of God, by plucking one string at a time on his guitar. It was the only song played and the rest of the mass was recited. I'm really not sure just how successful this mission was, but musically, it was a dud! St. Stan's didn't take to changes all that much in the early days, however, now is a completely different story.

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Yes, eventually guitars did infiltrate the liturgies at St. Stan's and it reached some sort of popularity for a while but it eventually died out. When Fr. Abernathy died, the folk group played 1 or 2 parts for the vigil mass, but not the actual funeral. I recall Fr. Howley telling Fr. Hellman, when they were discussing the actual funeral, "They'll be NO guitars!" Of course he said it with a heavy brogue that you could cut with a knife. I believe the folk group eventually died out in the 80's but I'm not really sure as I left St. Stan's and Maspeth in 1971.

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Sorry I meant to write, I'm not "sure" of the year. I have got to proof read better before, I submit

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Another incident, actually 2, with the newly formed folk group, well of course Fr. Howley didn't like them at all, but one Sunday he had the 10 am mass. Okay, so I went home for a few minutes as I wasn't really needed, when I returned the coats and the guitars were on the floor in the sacristy, and the congregation was singing Holy God We Praise Thy Name unaccompanied! Needless to say something blew up and Fr. Howley never had the 10 am mass again as long as that group was singing. The other incident was Easter Sunday, Fr. Hellman had the mass and I just caught the ending as they were singing something called, "Alle, Alle, Alle!" After the mass, Fr Howley was screaming at Fr. Hellman, yelling, "Joe you've been a baby long enough! This garbage has to end! And just what the hell were they singing with this Alle, Alle, Alle?" "Just who are they honoring, Muhamed Alli??!!!" I just stood in the corner pretending not to listen, but I was hysterical laughing on the inside! I never really took to this type of music at first but as things became more adjusted, and still to this day some 45 years later, I'm still not a devotee of this music, but I am a bit more tolerable of it. Once again, I just had to share this, not funny then, but now,
well . . . you decide.

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As I mentioned I left St.Stan's in 1971, I heard that in 1972 or 73 Fr. Hellman left the priesthood to get married. Then a few years later under Fr. Kammer's regime, Fr. Howley had left too.Now whether he left the priesthood too I really can't say. Fr. Kammer's only assistant was Fr. John Sherman. A sad vestige of what used to be. Ah well, nothing stays the same forever!

Fran Kosinski
11/3/2013

I remember Abbey singing. He had Polio -I think. I sing in the choir here at St. Andrew the Apostle in Sierra Vista. Fr. Greg just built a church 5 years ago. Instead of the Protestant looking church that is common today, he built the Taj Mahal as pastor Sean from Calvary's Rock put it. You can Google it and see the beautiful church. Fr. Greg is a convert from being a Lutheran Minister. We also have an Anglican priest. His wife has already converted to Catholicism.
The 5M Sunday Mass is called Life Teen. Not many Teens want to be in the choir because "they have too much to do". They sing one week and the older people sing the other three. We have electric guitars, drums, bongos, flute, sax, mandolin, maracas, etc. The people here are very progressive so they enjoy coming to the 5PM . We sing Chris Tomlin, Matt Maher, DC Talk, among others. Our Marian songs are traditional. It is a different crowd. I led the Choir as a sub music minister at another church and because the people are older they wanted traditional and even came back to ask who was selecting the songs now because they really liked it.
Fr. Howley was something else. Last I heard he did leave the priesthood to get married. We would watch him outside the classroom window each day walking to a woman's house on Maspeth Ave just down from the convent. We saw her come to church and she was well dressed and very made up. Do you think he was going for coffee and counseling sessions? It was a big gossip story that everyone knew. In those days the old folks would not questions anything because of the reverence they had for the office of the priesthood.
Yes, we sing ALLE. It is a song from either Africa or the Islands. It is a rousing song to say the least. When I was in Choir, The Choir won second place in competition with other choirs in the Diocese of Brooklyn. My friend, Bernadette Carini took piano lessons from Sr. Margaret for $2.00 a lesson and she played beautifully. My sister took guitar and my brother took violin. Sr. Margaret was a great teacher of music. I sub taught in local schools here and was surprised that music theory was not taught they just listen to recordings and sing along. In one class I had, I taught them how to dance rock and roll and they loved it.
I remember how many Masses were said 6AM, 7 AM, 8 AM 9 AM 10 AM, 1100AM and 1215 with a 9AM in the school hall because the church was for the school at 9AM.
Do you remember Mrs. Mulligan? I believe she was a third grade teacher.
My Grandmother went to Holy Cross because she and my Grandfather immigrated from Poland. She died when I was stationed in Korea. I had just returned from the states because my father passed and I could not come back because of mission requirements. My parents sent us to Holy Cross on Saturdays for a while to learn Polish to no avail. They taught high class (Warsaw)Polish and my parents spoke a slang so they did not understand what we were saying. No more Saturday classes.

Fran Kosinski
11/3/2013

I remember Abbey singing. He had Polio -I think. I sing in the choir here at St. Andrew the Apostle in Sierra Vista. Fr. Greg just built a church 5 years ago. Instead of the Protestant looking church that is common today, he built the Taj Mahal as pastor Sean from Calvary's Rock put it. You can Google it and see the beautiful church. Fr. Greg is a convert from being a Lutheran Minister. We also have an Anglican priest. His wife has already converted to Catholicism.
The %PM Sunday Mass is called Life Teen. Not many Teens want to be in the choir because "they have too much to do". They sing one week and the older people sing the other three. We have electric guitars, drums, bongos, flute, sax, mandolin, maracas, etc. The people here are very progressive so they enjoy coming to the 5PM . We sing Chris Tomlin, Matt Maher, DC Talk, among others. Our Marian songs are traditional. It is a different crowd. I led the Choir as a sub music minister at another church and because the people are older they wanted traditional and even came back to ask who was selecting the songs now because they really liked it.
Fr. Howley was something else. Last I heard he did leave the priesthood to get married. We would watch him outside the classroom window each day walking to a woman's house on Maspeth Ave just down from the convent. We saw her come to church and she was well dressed and very made up. Do you think he was going for coffee and counseling sessions? It was a big gossip story that everyone knew. In those days the old folks would not questions anything because of the reverence they had for the office of the priesthood.

Yes, we sing ALLE. It is a song from either Africa or the Islands. It is a rousing song to say the least. When I was in Choir, The Choir won second place in competition with other choirs in the Diocese of Brooklyn. My friend, Bernadette Carini took piano lessons from Sr. Margaret for $2.00 a lesson and she played beautifully. My sister took guitar and my brother took violin. Sr. Margaret was a great teacher of music. I sub taught in local schools here and was surprised that music theory was not taught they just listen to recordings and sing along. In one class I had, I taught them how to dance rock and roll and they loved it.
I remember how many Masses were said 6AM, 7 AM, 8 AM 9 AM 10 AM, 1100AM and 1215 with a 9AM in the school hall because the church was for the school at 9AM.
Do you remember Mrs. Mulligan? I believe she was a third grade teacher.
My Grandmother went to Holy Cross because she and my Grandfather immigrated from Poland. She died when I was stationed in Korea. I had just returned from the states because my father passed and I could not come back because of mission requirements. My parents sent us to Holy Cross on Saturdays for a while to learn Polish to no avail. They taught high class (Warsaw)Polish and my parents spoke a slang so they did not understand what we were saying. No more Saturday classes.

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Yes, Abby could have had polio. I do recall, just before his death, he could hardly walk and I also recall he used to drink probably to numb his pain. So, Fr. Howley DID get married! Well . . . it's not surprising at all. He used to have an eye for any and all the pretty women, but I'm sure he's long dead by now. Mrs. Mulligan had the 2nd grade, in fact, I had her as a teacher. The last time I saw her was back in 1970 and if I recall correctly she was still teaching the second grade. I don't recall a 6 am mass on Sunday, but that doesn't mean there wasn't one at one point. I do recall, 7, 8 , 9 - church for school, 9 hall for adults, 10, 11, and 12:15. Then at one point they switched the 9 to church adults and hall for children. Then later on everything began to change drastically. Now, with the partial merger with of Transfiguration, St. Stan's, the last i heard, has Saturday @ 6pm; Sunday is 8, 9:30, 11 and 12:30 which is in Spanish. Altogether different from the "OLD" St. Stan's. But as I said, "Life goes on."

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You know, come to think of it, if I recall correctly, there was a 6:30 am mass on first Fridays. The weekday masses were 7, 7:30, 8, 8:30 & 9. On first Fridays, during school, all the students would go to the 8 am for mass and benediction with Sr. Margaret Concepter playing the organ and the girls choir singing.. I believe the schedule was 6:30, 7, 7:30, 8 and 9 am. Your earlier email mentioned Miss Herdle in the 4th grade, she was the replacement for Miss Gouck, who left to raise a family. I don't recall anyone earlier who taught that class. I know the other 4th grade had Sr. Anna Clennus. She used to run the movies that would always develop some sort of problems and break down in the middle of the movie. I recall, Sr. Catherine Marita taking over that 4th grade and Sr. Anna Clennus took over the 5th grade. When she left Sr. Mary Leticia took over, with Sr. Mary Lambert teaching the other 5th grade. Miss Mitchell had the 6th grade for many years so I guess she retired and Sr. Leticia took her place, with Sr. Auxillia in the other 6th grade. The two 7th grades had Sr. Felicita and Sr. Pacifica. The two 8th grades had Sr. Jean Amata and Sr. Joseph Ligouri. As I mentioned earlier, most if not all these sisters are either dead or left the order, with the exception of Sr. Francis Claire who is in the mother house of the Srs.of St. Joseph in Brentwood Long Island. She is still in the order and takes care of, what is left, of the other elderly and infirm sisters. It's not an easy task, but it must quite rewarding.

Another little story, this time it's Sr. Mary Leticia. She had the 6th grade and we had just made Confirmation. The year was either 1964 or 1965. It was towards the end of winter and there was still some snow around. It was 3 pm and I was walking up 61st Street towards Flushing Ave, when Sr. Leticia came rushing by to get the bus. As she boarded the bus, I was walking down Flushing Avenue. I spotted this kid, don't know who, ready to toss a snow ball at the bus. He did, and at the next stop, which was only a few feet away, the bus stops and out comes Sr. Leticia. The kid didn't see her and the next thing you know she grabs him and is beating the living crap out him. I slowed down a bit and all I heard was her snarling, "Just try something like that again sonny and you'll regret the day you were born!" That was the trade mark of Sr. Leticia,even if she knew you, and she got mad, she would call you "SONNY"! Unless you were a girl, however I forgot what she called the girls. Sr. Joseph Ligouri would call the boys "MISTER" and the girls "MISS"! which was followed by a slap but she eventually mellowed as things started to change around the middle 60's. But all in all, this episode made that day quite memorable, not only for me but also for that poor unfortunate kid that got beat up by Sr. Leticia.

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There was another incident with Sr. Leticia, this time it was just BEFORE Confirmation. Once student meekly asked if he could have a sponsor an she leered at him, grabbed him by his shirt and dragged him into the hall. Ironically the kids closest to the door went to see what was happening. Allegedly, she had taken this guys belt off and was letting him have it good! And for good measure, she almost pushed him down a flight of stairs! When they came back into the classroom, she pushed him in, and sneering said, "You still want a sponsor sonny?!!" All the poor guy did was sit down at his desk and cried! Quite a memorable morning at old St. Stan's.

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Okay one more little tidbit. The year was 1966, I was in the eight grade with Sr. Joseph Ligouri. Myself and several other big guys were made patrol boys and I was assigned to the corner just opposite Carvel on Grand Street. One fine morning, the crossing guard grabbed this kid from Holy Cross school. She then tells me and my partner to go to the school and report what happened. Well . . . needless to say, like 2 dopes, we did. We got back late and when we went back to our school class room there was Sr. Ligouri waiting for us. She got us in the hall and, although she didn't yell or hit, she was actually concerned but tough as nails. We told her the truth, and she stood there staring with a look that burned completely through you. She then said, "Get inside and DO NOT do that again. IS THAT CLEAR?!!" Of course all we could do is nod our heads and say, "Yes sister." Isn't it just amazing that after so many years, these things come mind as clear as day.

Frances Kosinski
11/8/2013

All your memories seem to be of incidents that I do not recall. All my memories of St. Stans and the Teachers and Nuns are mostly pleasant. I am going to ask my brother and sister if anything like you describe ever happened to them because it sure did not happen to me. I do not remember the abuse you say was happening in the school. I think the parents would have been involved if their children were being abused by the nuns. As I said, I sub taught in the public school and it is a disgrace. The kids are out of control. They get promoted just because they sat in the class. No work necessary. I had a history class and started preparing my lessons and said to another teacher "this is not the History I learned". According to the new books we never did anything correctly in the US. Everything was our fault. Funny, why does everyone want to come here. I believe that the education I received in Catholic school is the reason for my success. I am always grateful for it. Why did the crossing guard grab the kid from Holy Cross?

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Frances, please don't misinterpret what I'm saying. These little incidents just come to mind randomly as I recall some of the sisters and the children I grew up with. Remember too, it was a different age back then. What we see as "Abuse" today was called "Discipline" back then. My mother introduced herself to Sr. Leticia once and after a VERY brief conversation, as Sr. Leticia really didn't want to be bothered, my mother just asked how I was doing in my studies, to which she replied, "If you want to know check his work!" So that took care of that! But, I know myself, as I mentioned earlier, that if it wasn't for the dedication and discipline of all the sisters, I know for a fact I could never do what I'm doing today, and I heartily applaud them ALL for EVERYTHING these remarkable women undertook. Now we all knew there were some wise asses in those days that needed to be disciplined. However, I could see it for myself that as time went on, towards the middle sixties, the sisters seemed to have mellowed a bit. Quite possibly they could see what was happening and that things were changing. I'm also sure that some parents knew what was going on, but no one could or would do anything. Of course now its completely different and I'm certain that the standard of catholic education is just as good, if not better, as it was then. I see this here at Our Lady Queen of Martyrs in Forest Hills. All the altar servers, the school liturgies and the quality of education is much higher than it was in my day. Of course its a whole new world today and all the sisters are gone but these children are our future leaders and I really feel that many of them will make a big difference in the very near future!

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Ooopps, I almost forgot about that child from Holy Cross. Well . . . the only reason I could recall was that with the outer coats you couldn't really tell who was from where, and the crossing guard was just doing her job and she was trying to get us to do the same. Thankfully no harm was done and we just got a stern warning from Sr. Ligouri. It could have been much worse!

Frances I do feel compelled to say one last remark, that in those days many of our parents went to catholic school too. My mother and my several aunts went to St. Joseph's on Sudam Street in Bushwick, Brooklyn. They had the Srs. of St. Dominic, and they were just as tough as the Srs. of St. Joseph. So, if you went home and told your parents that you got yelled at or smacked, in most cases they would reply,"So did I when I went to school!!!" Again it was different time, and things were so much different then they are today. If you just look at a child the wrong way today, you wind up in court! Of course whether this is for the better or not, time will tell, but speaking for myself, a little stern discipline is a good thing, BUT not by beating the poor child senseless!!!

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Okay, one more little incident, this time with Sr. Mary Felicita, who replaced Sr. St. Gemma. I was in the 7th grade, the year was 1964 and being riddled with arthritis they had that 7th grade moved to the first floor so she didn't have to climb all those stairs. Being in practically the same condition myself today, I know exactly what this poor woman was going through. Any way, there was one or two students who didn't seem to bathe themselves properly and one afternoon Sr. went a bit berserk screaming,"This classroom stinks!!!". She went to say, "I want all of boys to remove their shirts and the girls to loosen their blouses!!!" Not satisfied she then made us all kneel on the floor. Well . . . luckily Sr. Raphael Maria, the principal, came in and made us all get up and get dressed. Once again, you really cannot understand why these incidents ever took place, but they did. I do recall, Sr. Raphael taking Sr. Felicita aside, but I don't know what the out come was. I believe she had the 7th grade for one more year and then she was put in charge of the school library. Eventually she was transferred and Sr. Merriam Elizabeth took over the library. Another day in the "OLD" St. Stans.

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Frances Kosinski
11/10/2013

I had Sr. Felicita a year or two before you. She was wonderful. My parents also went to Catholic School St Stans in Brooklyn and St Cyrils in Brooklyn. I never heard anything about being overly disciplined. I am sorry you have such bad memories. My siblings and I have only good memories. I also went on to Christ the King HS. When we moved I hated public school; NO discipline, NO respect for teachers. Even back then constant cheating. Passing drugs in the hall. The 60"s was when it started and I know if I did not have the foundation that the nuns gave me. I would have fallen by the wayside as so many public school students did. You can see the result in the kids today. They are a product of the children of the drugs. No God, Abortion, cohabitation, disrespect for elders. Get rid of everyone over 50 we are useless.

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Once again, and for the final time, my memories of the "OLD" St. Stan's were not bad. Once again, if I could go back I would in a minute. The incidents I recalled would naturally stand out in any ones mind if they had experienced it. Never once did it turn me away from the church or any catholic beliefs. It never for a second turned me against the sisters. I still to this day, some 50 years later, miss, admire and applaud them. It's NOT easy to have 55+ students in a class room. I wish I could go back just to see again what I took for granted would always be there! I too spent my high school years in a public school and I recalled just about everything the sisters said and I got through it and without the long hair, side burns, tight clothes, drugs, smoking, drinking and whatever else was happening back then. I was independent and still am today, probably that's why everything turned out the way it did, and I have no regrets!

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Actually to take it one step further, if anything, to still recall all these moments today only adds to the fact that not only did I succeed in my endeavors but it makes me feel, in a way, privileged, to have gone through them. If it weren't for the endurance of the sisters in my early years, I could never have become a CEO of a prestigious Wall Street firm while earning 3 doctorate degrees and still be able to play the organ for various churches on the weekend. Not bad is it?

Okay, here's one for the book . . . I began St. Stan's in the 1st grade, but I do recall my mother taking to register or whatever they called it back then. I started in 1959, but registered, I guess, sometime earlier that year or the year before. Any way, at the time, it was Sr. Joan Thomas in the 1st grade, and who later took over the 3rd grade. So when the time came, my mother dropped me off and I went to the school basement. There must have been over 100 others all screaming and crying. I made up my mind then and there that I wouldn't cry! As memory serves I didn't. Well after what seemed an eternity, we were divided into to 2 classes, 1A1 and 1A2. I was in 1A1 with 60 others and we had Sr. Francis Claire; 1A2 I believe, had another 60 with Sr. Mary Leonard. Okay we were marched into our classroom and it began with an introduction, a good morning, and a little prayer. We only had a half day and were dismissed at noon. As I can recall, there were no incidents and not too much crying. Of course as time progressed it became a 9 to 3 deal with an hour for lunch. I remember to this day how good the hot dogs used to smell as they were being prepared. I never ate lunch in school, as I lived only 4 short blocks, so I went home for lunch. It's really amazing how you can recall these little events some 50 years later, but I guess there are some things we just don't forget.

Frances Kosinski
11/16/2013

I remember going to school the first day, too. Maybe one or two were crying but most were quiet. We had older siblings in school and we wanted to go to school to be like them. I lived only a block from school so we went home for lunch, too. My mother worked and so Mrs. Carini kept and eye on us. I especially remember the tuna sandwiches. They were the best. Philip Tyrone was in my class. He was special needs and at that time there were no programs. By third grade he was getting violent and was throwing chairs at the nun. He never came back to school. His brother was in my brother's class. I remember Chinese jump rope and double dutch. I saw some people doing it the other day at our organization day celebration. Did your class have a favorite student. Ours was Donna Targonski. She was an only child and I bet her parents gave plenty to the church.

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Hmmm, a favorite student? Well . . . 1 or 2 come to mind as being very intelligent, always getting 90's and 100's but I really can't pin point any one in particular. I do recall the many different activities in the school yard until the bell rang. Yes, I do recall Philip Tyrone too. I think, at one point, he threw his school bag down the stairs and it hit Sr. Auxilia in the back of the head. I don't really know what happened after that. Like you mentioned, he never came back to school. I recall too, the mother's club bringing cup cakes and orange juice on Halloween. The school play at Christmas time comes to mind also. I don't remember it, but someone once reminded me that I was one of the 3 Kings, most likely in the 2nd or 3rd grade, but I really can't recall that. You had mentioned Miss Herdle in the 4th grade, I believe Miss Gouck was her replacement and when she left, Miss Mendenhall took over. I had Mrs. Mulligan in the 2nd grade, and we also made 1st Communion then too. When that time came, Sr. Francis Claire took over and guided us through different rehearsals until we had received communion. When I got to the 3rd grade, Sr. John Muriel had our class and Sr. Margaret Aloysius was replaced by Sr. Donald Maria in the other 3rd grade. We had Miss Gouck in the 4th grade; Sr. Mary Lambert in the 5th; We would have had Miss Mitchel in the 6th but I guess she retired and Sr. Mary Leticia took over. We made Confirmation in that grade along with the other 6th grade and, I believe, the two 2 5th grades as well. In those days, Confirmation was every other year. The 7th grade was Sr. Mary Felicita and we were back on the first floor as Sr. Feilcita wasn't able to climb the stairs, the poor woman, I know what its like being riddled with arthritis having it myself and just simple walking is very difficult. On to the 8th grade with Sr. Joseph Ligouri. She was VERY tough, but once you really got to know her she was as gentle as a lamb. That year we all graduated and went onto high school. Some of the students from St. Stan's went to the same high school as I did, but gradually they just became faces that passed by in the hallways. Once again I can only reiterate how you can amazingly recall so many events, even after some 50+ years later. Well . . . I guess we NEVER really forget certain times in our lives, do we?

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Nancy Dombrowski Losinno
12/26/2013

I came across this website this afternoon and read every posting with great interest. My sisters and I all went to St. Stan's. My older sister Jayne Dombrowski was a year older and graduated in 1963. I graduated in 1964 and all of the names of the nuns that you mentioned came back to me. My two other sisters were Anita and Christine. My parents owned the liquor store just up the street from the Carvel on Grand Ave. Jayne and I went on to Grover Cleveland HS while Anita and Christine went on to Christ the King. I lived most of my life in Queens until 1992 when I moved to Long Island when I got married. I graduated with a BA in Psychology from Queens College, got an MSW from Adelphi Univ and worked as a psychotherapist in Forest Hills up until one year ago. When I got married I exchanged vows in Our Lady Queen of Martyrs in FH and our daughter was christened there in 1994. I still have many deep ties to Queens, and especially the Forest Hills area.

Regarding St. Stans, all of the memories came flooding back. Though I give credit to the nuns for managing 55 kids in the classroom, their methods of classroom management were tyrannical by today's standards. Then, it was all we knew. They were not charging tuition then, and I remember that the oldest kid in a family paid $3 plus some money for school supplies, and the second or third child did not have that $3 fee. I remember Sr. Margaret Concepta and her music direction and the Wed afternoon hymn practice, the compulsory 9 am Sunday classes, the whacking on the back of the legs if you were leaning against the seat of the pew, selling chance books, subscriptions to magazines, Christmas cards, and the box of religious articles from which you could buy a statue, rosary beads or water font for your home. The kids who were selected for the privilege of being out of the classroom in order to sell religious articles or candy or pretzels were the "upper echelon." I remember the red paddle which was reserved for the worst of beatings or sometimes the bad kids had to lay out their hands so that the nun could smack their knuckles with the ruler. The kids who got to clean the erasers or the blackboards were either the good kids or the hell-raisers that the nuns just wanted to get out of the classroom for a while. There was no "special education" then for kids who had special problems.

Sr. Joan Thomas was one of my favorite nuns and I have a picture of her at the piano in the convent when my mother baked a cake for the nuns (it may have been when she was leaving). I liked her so much that when I was confirmed, I took the name "Joan" as my confirmation name. I too was never good in arithmetic but I was very good at reading and I give the nuns credit for that. To this day, I am an avid reader and researcher and am working on a PhD at age 62. Some of my friends when I was at St. Stans were Nancy Casullo who lived across Grand Ave from the school, and Susan Pinkus who lived towards Ridgewood. I was in classes with Eileen Reeb, Rosemary Bruno, Pat Lovinkaitis, Michael Czech, Richie Caldwell, Michael Browne, Michael Mahon, & Thomas Cappiello.

I always looked forward to the spring time processions where the girls carried flowers and got to wear a fancy dress. I do believe that those flowers then smelled better. I can still remember how wonderful the carnations smelled in my 1st communion bouquet.

Sr, Stella Francis, our principal who was moved to another school in Queens, eventually wound up at Stella Maris HS in Rockaway. I remember one Sunday when our family drove out there and visited with her. I also remember the day when Kennedy was assassinated and watching the events unfold on the tv which was allowed in the classroom. I remember "air raid drills" and the sounding of the sirens and having to go under those desks. During the years of the Cold War, we lived in fear of what the Russians were going to do to us. At my current job, they have an ancient air raid siren that they test (I don't know why) every Monday at Noon. It brings it all back for me.

My memories of St. Stans and Maspeth are all very nostalgic but not all happy ones. The positive ones are pizza from Jim's Pizza (not Pats) who was friends with my father, and the smell of fresh cut grass in the evening since we lived across from Mt. Olivet Cemetery. My sisters and I were allowed to put our baby sister in the carriage and walk all the way over to Maurice Park to go on the swings....all this without adult supervision...over the Expressway overpass. This would have never happened today. It is nice to recall these times when things were simpler.

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Your letter was absolutely a joy to read and a fantastic trip down memory lane. As you mentioned not all the memories were exactly happy, but such is life. We all take the good with the bad, but agreeably, it was a much simpler time in all our lives and ones that will never be forgotten.

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Oh yes, I do recall Jim's pizzeria too as well as your parents liquor store. If memory serves correctly there was also a paint and arts supply store there as well. I went in there one day to purchase pastel colored chalk. I also recall those air raid drills and having to either going out in the hall or squeeze under my desk, which for me wasn't easy! I never had Sr. Joan Thomas as a teacher, but I knew of her as she was close to Sr. Francis Claire. It was Sr. Francis Claire who told me many years later that Sr. Joan Thomas left the order. I also recall going on a school trip to the 1964 World's Fair. It was a clear, warm day and I remember quite vividly walking down one of the sidewalks and, I guess, she wasn't watching very carefully, but Sr. Ann Immaculate tripped and fell. Sr. Mary Lambert helped her up. She didn't get hurt and she tried to laugh it off, but it must have been quite embarrassing! There was also a trip to Queens Blvd to see the Pope. I was standing on the corner of Grande Ave and Queens Blvd when he passed and I recall Sr. Mary Lambert asking me if I had seen him. I told her with a smile, "Sure I did." But in actuality, I really didn't as he passed by so quickly! Then I had to walk home as there weren't any buses running. I think I enjoyed watching the LIRR trains passing under Grande Ave more than anything else. But, all in all, it was an interesting experience.

Nancy Dombrowski Losinno
1/10/2014

Yes. there was a paint store next to the liquor store...Irmac's Paints. After my mother retired from doing the liquor business, the store was empty for a number of years. The two brothers who bought what was Irmac's were an accountant and attorney who turned it into their office. Eventually, they bought the space which had been the liquor store, broke through the wall, and expanded their offices. Pat's Pizza is gone, Carvel is gone (with their huge parking lot), Griff's Hardware is gone also.

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Mmmm, yes, I knew about Griff's hardware, they were in Maspeth for over 80 years I believe. Although it may sound strange, I used to enjoy going into Griff's, not only for tools and things, but I loved their hardwood floors. I didn't know Pat's and Carvel were gone. The last time I was in Maspeth was when St. Stan's church was redone. I also recall the 5 and 10 and the A & P on Grande Ave, as well as Leberfeld's where we used to purchase the school uniforms. And just a bit further up, past the expressway, The Maspeth Theater and John's bargain store, and who could forget Dozerbacker's bakery, not sure of the spelling. There was a druggist on the corner, just a half block from the bakery and next door was a candy store of some type that had a grill and they used to make the most delicious hamburgers. Aahhh yes quite a difference from today.

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Nancy Dombrowski Losinno
2/25/2014

Since you are really into the Maspeth nostalgia, there is a Facebook group called "You Know that You Live in Maspeth".

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